#63: Expert Interview with Alice Derock, Entrepreneur & Founder of Wet For Her - Jenn T. Grace—Book Publisher, Speaker, and Author

#63: Expert Interview with Alice Derock, Entrepreneur & Founder of Wet For Her

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AUDIO TITLE:  Episode #63 – Alice Derock Interview

Jenn T Grace:

Alright so I guess what I’d love to just have you maybe walk us through a little bit about your history, maybe a little bit about what you’ve done in the past, and what you- you know what experiences maybe led you to the point where you are, where you founded your current company.

Alice Derock:

Okay, so I used to work in the hotels in France, like at five star hotels. And I always wanted to be an entrepreneur, and see what was missing was the idea of which product I could bring to the market, something new and something, you know that will help people or it be- yeah that would help people. So one day with my girlfriend we went to a love store to buy a sex toy, and the only thing that was proposed to us was really like you know realistic and with like not good image with straight girls on the back of the packaging and we were just like, “Don’t you have anything for lesbians?” And the guy said, “No we don’t have.” And so then we went on the Internet and we didn’t find any manufacturer of sex toys for lesbians. So this from where the story starts.

Jenn T Grace:

Okay so like most entrepreneurs, you’re starting from a place of you were looking for something for yourself, and ended up-

Alice Derock:

Exactly.

Jenn T Grace:

Yeah. Okay so can you I guess share with the listeners where you’re located, and then additionally- I know we were just talking about the different places that you have warehouses, because you are a global company. So I’d love for them to kind of get a good sense of just the size and magnitude of your-

Alice Derock:

Sure. So we started the business in France, like we launched the business in France and then like three months after, I moved to New York and then I really started the company in New York in fact. And so today the head office is in New York, we have the company in France also for all of Europe. We have warehouses in like California, in Santa Clara, warehouse in Paris, and we have just opened a warehouse in Sydney now. So we’re covering North America, Europe, and Australia.

Jenn T Grace:

So what I guess in your work experience, or your past industry knowledge, or anything like that made you feel like you had what it took to basically carve out an entire new niche within a huge industry that’s very male dominated I would imagine?

Alice Derock:

What helped me with my experience?

Jenn T Grace:

Mm hmm.

Alice Derock:

I will say- I would say that today what my experience in the hotel industry helped me with customer service, and that might be the only thing because coming from the hotel industry where we are giving service in fact to customers, it’s very different from being a manufacturer. So I had to learn every step from designing, manufacturing, with the mold, with how it worked, packaging, and then shipping, and then warehousing, and then setting. And then we have all the marketing and everything. So I had to learn a lot in fact.

Jenn T Grace:

That sounds kind of crazy. So how long did it take you to go from inception of ‘we need to do this because we ourselves need this, so we need to create this,’ to actually having a product that goes to market?

Alice Derock:

It took like- it took like a year and a half.

Jenn T Grace:

Wow, that’s not bad.

Alice Derock:

But that’s not too bad, but that was only for one product. So it can go fast, but the mistake that I made was to put to the market only one product. We should have done like maybe a line of products and we did like maybe launched like five or six products one at a time altogether. And not only one product. That’s easier when you have multiple products to launch a company I think. You offer more products to customers- to your customers.

Jenn T Grace:

And how do you decide when you launch a new product now? And I guess maybe going back track a little, what year did you found your company?

Alice Derock:

What do you mean by that?

Jenn T Grace:

I guess was it like 2009 that you decided to start the company?

Alice Derock:

Yes, 2009, yeah. Yeah and as I was not from the sex toy industry so you have to learn- you have to know the people, you have to know all the shows, where to go, you have to find the good salespeople, and you have to- how can I say? To get settled to be ready to sell, and this takes a lot of time in fact. Buying the good warehousing, buying the good packaging, and everything. So this takes a lot of time. When you are like me, and you’d never done any packaging or manufacturing before.

Jenn T Grace:

And did you find resources that were helpful for you? Like different people, or I guess companies that were able to help you with that I guess packaging and designing? Because I feel like I would have no idea where to start, even begin thinking about where to even start in terms of manufacturing anything.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, yeah it took time because you need- exactly you need to find the good person. So to produce, to manufacture the sex toys, this was the most difficult part, to find somebody reliable that will manufacture with a good quality, and then ship it correctly so when you ask pink, it arrives pink, and not a kind of pink. Yeah, that’s what took the most- that was the most difficult part.

Jenn T Grace:

And did you face any I guess adversity for being lesbians and coming into this industry? Or even just being women and coming into this industry?

Alice Derock:

Oh no, no. No, everybody has been really helpful. Even if it’s a male dominated industry, they have been really helpful also. They were thinking that girls would like to have realistic dildos, and they thought that by offering something different, they could have new market share and have new customers also.

Jenn T Grace:

And I guess if we’re talking about just market share, and marketing. So I took time and I was poking around your website, and I feel like it’s just got such a nice sleek design and look to it. But what- how are you marketing to your current customers? Like what avenues are you going down? And do you find that there’s different types of marketing that you’re doing based on who within the lesbian community you’re trying to reach?

Alice Derock:

Yeah so there’s two focus on it. First we want a website that is dedicated 100% for the lesbians. So when you get on it, you know it’s for you. You don’t get on the sex toy website where you don’t know which toy is for you, and it’s mixed with the straight people, it’s mixed with the guy’s sex toys, and there’s so many products that at the end you don’t know which one to choose. So that’s the first focus and the second focus is we want to be a bit apart of what the others are doing. We are more thinking about enhancing what women’s pleasure between girls, then trying to replace something that we don’t have. So most of- if I take the strap-on harness, or that are realistic, you feel sometimes that you’re buying this toy because you’re missing something. And we just want the girls to be comfortable and want to have fun in bed, and you know feel like- you know those toys are for them.

Jenn T Grace:

That makes a lot of sense. And I guess- I’m trying to- what is your day-to-day look like as a business owner of such a large- you know still relatively new, you know just being six years old. What does your I guess day-to-day look like? Because you were saying that kind of had to learn all of these different skill and wear all these different hats. Is that still the case now, or do you have more people kind of helping you in these other areas?

Alice Derock:

Yes, today I have more people working for me, but I’m still learning a lot for everything, for this website, Google, SEO and stuff like that. But my day-to-day, like day-to-day is all the customer orders and my- and the distributor’s and retailer’s orders; that’s what I do like every morning, check the orders. If there’s any message, wrong address, or stuff like that. And then we are- in the afternoon it’s more about project development. Like new toys, or websites, you know modules you want to change, or opening like a new location in Sydney. Things like that.

Jenn T Grace:

And are you yourself, or your employees, or I guess your company in active and involved within LGBT activity. And regardless of where- like whether you’re talking about being in France, or whether it’s New York or California, or Australia. Are you trying to get your name and brand out there through just traditional kind of events and networking?

Alice Derock:

Yes, we do. Yeah, we- I always wanted to you know, just sponsor some Prides and things like that. But so far we have been too- we had too much work to find enough time to settle all this. But it might happen next year to us, and so- yeah to do the sponsoring thing. We do some PR, we do some advertising, banners with for example Autostraddle, Curve magazine. And so, yeah we do giveaways, we do contests, this is it yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

And I feel like as a lesbian owned business who’s marketing to lesbians as a big part of the business, do you see different nuances or different ways in which to reach the community that allows for you to be successful in doing that? And I ask the question because a lot of the people listening to this are allies to the community, so they’re straight people looking to market to the community in a way that’s just authentic and genuine. If you had any piece of maybe advice or just some kind of a tip that you would provide somebody, you know what would that look like for you?

Alice Derock:

I would say that the best way to market to the lesbian community is to be where the girls are reading articles, or where they’re having fun. And for me so far the best is the websites, and yeah it’s to advertise on websites.

Jenn T Grace:

So you’re doing the banner advertising or whatever it happens to be.

Alice Derock:

Yes, yeah. I think for me this is the best way to reach the lesbian community.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s good to know, and I know that you just mentioned like Curve and Autostraddle which are both very large lesbian-focused publications, so that certainly-

Alice Derock:

Yeah, GoMag, and you have Shewired, and all the- yeah all the major magazines- yeah websites and magazines.

Jenn T Grace:

And in terms of we all know that business ownership is not always an easy task, and there’s plenty of times where it’s just emotionally, mentally, physically exhausting.

Alice Derock:

Yes.

Jenn T Grace:

Do you have something that just kind of keeps you motivated to just keep kind of trudging along even when it’s hard.

Alice Derock:

I think it’s because I’m convinced that it’s- we are doing great products and we are giving- we are doing something for the community. I think this is what motivates me every day, and when it’s hard. Because the idea behind Wet For Her is if like five years before, we didn’t have the same rights that the straight people; like we couldn’t get married, we couldn’t have children, and the idea behind this was okay our sexuality are making us different, so why don’t we take this difference and make it something that could, you know, put back money in the community in advertising, you know? Like I do in banners with magazines. And so that’s the idea behind Wet For Her. So if we are different by our sexuality, why don’t we create something that would bring money back into our sexuality- into our community? So that’s- yeah because we at Wet For Her, we advertise with LGBT magazines, more lesbian magazines of course. But if you take a straight sex toy company, they would never do any banners or anything in any lesbian magazine. So to just keep the money, doesn’t go back into it.

Jenn T Grace:

I like that, because it’s very full circle. It’s very kind of-

Alice Derock:

Exactly, yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

And I think that’s really important for you personally.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, it is.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s really interesting. And do you have I guess some kind of like piece of advice; because I’m sure, I can’t imagine that there were- there was nobody around you when you decided that you were going to build this empire, that wasn’t somewhat skeptical of what you were doing. But at that time, did somebody give you any type of advice that just really kept you going as you were really just kind of- I’m sure doing trial and error trying to make your way through figuring out how to set this up.

Alice Derock:

I think it’s- I found one day this sentence from Donald Trump. It was, ‘Focus, follow one person until you succeed,’ and I keep always this in mind is when you have a good idea for a business, it has to work. So you need to focus every day on your- on what you have to do, and go step-by-step, grow slowly, and if you concentrate on this, then a year will pass and then you will have grown a lot. And don’t look too far, and don’t be scared.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s some really good stuff. And I guess if you were going to- would that be the same advice you would give to say a young lesbian who may be listening to this, who is trying to figure out what exactly she wants to do with her life. Whether it’s go work for a company, or start her own company. Would that be similar advice that you would give her? Or would there might be something different that you would say?

Alice Derock:

I would say to her you need to offer more than your competitors, and you need to bring to the market something new. From there, then it should work.

Jenn T Grace:

I feel like that’s very simple, and very true. So I always ask this question, and I feel like since you are an LGBT person who is serving the community, that leveraging your- I guess status if you will, as a highly visible LGBT person. Are you finding additional ways kind of on an on-going basis to really use your own personal reputation within the community for the betterment of the community?

Alice Derock:

Can you just explain what you said by ‘betterment’?

Jenn T Grace:

Just using- having your voice, because you have- I love the word empire so I love using your empire. Just you’re able to use your voice in a stronger way, and maybe get a message out to a larger audience of people as a result of just kind of how you’ve built your own personal brand.

Alice Derock:

Yeah. Okay, and the question is?

Jenn T Grace:

I’m trying to figure out the best way to phrase it. Because a lot of times when I’m talking to people, you know they happen to be just an LGBT business owner, but they’re not really using that to any advantage of theirs. So I guess it’s more of you’re doing this, and has it been a conscious decision to make that an advantage? Like to really leverage it for your own personal gain, and I guess the gain of the community?

Alice Derock:

Okay, no I- no I didn’t do it this way. I think that if you build a business, you have to be passionate about it. You have to have to be all in it. I couldn’t do toys for gay guys, I don’t know anything about guys. So I couldn’t do a brand for gay guys. So- and I think you- it’s so hard to build your business that if you’re not doing it honestly, I think it won’t work. It won’t last, you know?

Jenn T Grace:

I think you’re absolutely right with that. It’s about authenticity, right? And-

Alice Derock:

Yes.

Jenn T Grace:

And being genuine and sincere, and if you’re none of those things, then it’s likely going to fail.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, I think- yeah I think so. Yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

So I want to make sure that anyone who’s listening to this has an opportunity to reach out to you, go to your website and everything. But is there anything that you’re working on right now that’s just like super exciting that you would love to just kind of tell the world about?

Alice Derock:

Yeah, we are designing a new product for the girls. It’s a double-ended sex toy. So that means- because when you’re a lesbian couple, it’s usually one at a time when you’re making love. And the double-ended sex toys you can make love both together without a strap-on. So it’s a great product, it’s already on the market by a different brand. But what we have been facing is that none of those products were really working as they should, and are very expensive. So we have been working on this new toy for more than a year and a half now, and we’re going to release it in September.

Jenn T Grace:

And now what would the- I guess your execution strategy look like for that? So you have- you’ve been working on a year, you have a new product, and you’re about to release the product, launch it in September. What do you do from there? Like how do you I guess release it to the world? Are you doing a PR push? Is it just focusing your advertisements on that particular product? Like how does that I guess traditionally work?

Alice Derock:

Yes, we- first we want the product to be perfect so we do a lot of testing on what is actually on the market. We have lesbian couple testers, so then we do prototypes, we give the prototypes to the couples, then they come back to us. Once we have the good product and it works, and the girls- you know when you spend $120.00 for a sex toy, you want it to work and not to have something that, you know, doesn’t work. And then yeah, then we go to manufacturing, we produce it, and then we go with the PR- PR and marketing.

Jenn T Grace:

Makes sense. And I guess just because I’m curious about manufacturing in general, how do you know like what the right order, or the right quantity is to buy something? Especially when it’s a new product and you’re not necessarily sure how it’s going to sell? How has that worked I guess in the past?

Alice Derock:

Yeah, it’s always a risk. When you produce a new product, you have to put like thousands of dollars out and you are taking a big risk that it might not work. So this is why all the steps before; testing, prototypes are- you cannot skip this stage, this step.

Jenn T Grace:

It certainly seems so. And so in past product launches, have there been some of your products that have really just sold out really fast, and you under ordered, and then had the reverse happen too where you just ordered way too much and didn’t sell it?

Alice Derock:

Yeah, the last sex toy that we released, The Fusion, we didn’t order enough so we’re just like trying to- we were shipping from everywhere to the United States to have stock. It was crazy for Valentines this year. But then- but so far now we have been good in quantities. We have been good.

Jenn T Grace:

And is your distribution only online? Or do you ship to physical retailers?

Alice Derock:

Yes, we do have retailers, and we do have distributors. We have retailers in the United States with Good Vibes, Treasure Chest, Castle Megastore, and we are in a lot of shops in the US.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s awesome. So that’s good that you’re hitting both markets; those who are comfortable going into a store, and then those who prefer to go online.

Alice Derock:

Yes.

Jenn T Grace:

Interesting. And how do you- is there like any vetting process per say of finding what retailers you’re comfortable with putting your brand in?

Alice Derock:

I think it’s more- it’s more about the stores that are really happy to find a brand for the lesbian. Because some of them came to us and said, “Hey we are really happy to find Wet For Her because we have a lot of lesbian couples coming to our stores, and we don’t know what to give them. So if we have your brand, then you know they can go and have a look and they can choose into your brand.” And because most of the salespeople in love stores are more straight so they don’t know about the lesbian market. They don’t know how we make love, so it helps them to have a brand for lesbians.

Jenn T Grace:

I would imagine.

Alice Derock:

Make it easier.

Jenn T Grace:

Yeah, absolutely. And are you seeing your numbers increase in one avenue over another? So like is your retail side of things doing better than online? Or vice versa? Or is it just kind of comparable? How does that- I just- work?

Alice Derock:

Online is working very well. And retailers and distributors are growing also. But retailers and distributors, it’s a slower process.

Jenn T Grace:

And do you find that the process is a little bit slower because it requires a lot of education around your product and what makes your product different from other products that might be claiming to do the same thing that are on the market?

Alice Derock:

Yes it does, but also people want to test and see if lesbians are comfortable with this brand. And so they do test to see if it sells in their store, and if it does then they order more. So this is why it takes some time.

Jenn T Grace:

Yeah, that makes sense.

Alice Derock:

But I think it’s almost the same for every product, you know? Retailers want to see if it works before ordering a lot.

Jenn T Grace:

Yeah, that makes perfect sense.

Alice Derock:

Yes.

Jenn T Grace:

Interesting. And do you have like what your plans are for, I don’t know, a year from now what you hope to be, the company to look like, or five years from now, or even ten years from now? Do you have like a big picture strategy for the future?

Alice Derock:

Oh yes we do, yeah. We’re going to release new products in 2016, and we’re going to open in northern Europe, maybe Russia, by the end of this year. Open in Canada, open- yeah be almost everywhere.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s awesome. Have you thought about once you get to the place where you have enough of your products, that you would set up your own retailers? Not working with other retailers, but your own retail?

Alice Derock:

No, no, no.

Jenn T Grace:

It’s probably smart.

Alice Derock:

No, I won’t.

Jenn T Grace:

That seems very risky and like there’s too much work there.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, I think so, and being lesbian the market is too niche, and retailers are our partners so we don’t want to compete with our partners.

Jenn T Grace:

It makes sense.

Alice Derock:

And for sure- and also it’s- no, I’m sure it won’t work.

Jenn T Grace:

And I know that you said you had a background in working in hotels. Do you have any other I guess- any business experience or marketing experience or any degrees in anything like that either? Or is this really just kind of completely uncharted territory that you’re really mastering as you’re going along?

Alice Derock:

No, I don’t have- no I don’t have any degree in marketing or stuff like that.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s awesome, I feel like you-

Alice Derock:

I had to learn.

Jenn T Grace:

Well yeah, you’ve got to learn it as you go which I feel like-

Alice Derock:

Exactly, and make mistakes.

Jenn T Grace:

Yes. Yes.

Alice Derock:

And then you learn, once you’ve done a big mistake you learn very quickly.

Jenn T Grace:

And do you have any maybe a mistake or two that you’d be willing to share, that really is kind of one of those things that really made you learn really quick?

Alice Derock:

Yeah. What I’ve learned, it’s about listening to feedback and everything is feedback. If you don’t sell, it’s feedback. If you- yeah feedback, everything is about feedback. From where your sales are coming, and can you improve? If it sells this way then you have to go this way, and don’t go the other way because you think that you might be more clever than anybody else.

Jenn T Grace:

So listen to your customers.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, listen to your customers, yeah. Listen to feedback, everything is feedback.

Jenn T Grace:

And now I know that- so in the initial design stage; so you have the mold that you’re going through with the factory, you have people who are testing the products and making sure that everything is good, you’re listening to their feedback to figure out how to modify or adapt whatever it is. So say you have something like your Fusion product that you were talking about before. If somebody starts talking or you start getting emails or feedback or somehow you’re getting feedback around that product of how it could be enhanced even further, but it’s been like a year down the road. Is that something that you’re still really listening to that feedback, thinking-?

Alice Derock:

Yes of course, yeah because we started with the Fusion as it is today, and we will change the Fusion next year with all the improvements that we want to make.

Jenn T Grace:

So I would imagine that that’s got to be an interesting- an interesting process too. Because then you- are you starting from scratch essentially? Because now you have to redo the molds or whatever it is to kind of make whatever enhancements, and then you have to re-purchase a brand new order, and you still have stock of old stuff, and I’m sure that’s got to be a delicate balance.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, it’s going to be- yes but I think that if your product is good, I think this is what we are looking here at Wet For Her, is really to have the best products that work. And in the sex toy industry, there’s so many crap products that I think if you go to a high quality and make something work, I think for a company this is the best thing you can do for your customers.

Jenn T Grace:

I think that makes a lot of sense. This is really good, I feel like you’ve definitely been able to I guess share a little bit of information with my audience, because I feel like number one I’ve not ever had a guest on my show that has talked about sex toys, so that’s a first, so this is a first for us. But then the second is that I don’t often talk to business owners who have a manufacturing component to their business too, which is what’s really interesting to me, is to just kind of learn more about that. Because there’s so much more risk in my opinion anyway when it comes to manufacturing a product because you have to put so much into it in the front with the hope that you gain that back.

Alice Derock:

Yes, exactly, yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s interesting. So yeah, I feel like this has been good. One of the- I guess another question that I like to kind of throw out there and ask my guests, and then we can kind of wrap up, is do you have any particular- and again going back to the fact that I have allies who are listening to this, and I’m always trying to educate them on how to properly communicate and work with the LGBT community; oftentimes we’re talking about the lesbian community. But I find that when I ask my guests to share a coming out story of theirs, it helps them I guess relate a little bit more to who I’m speaking with. So do you have any type of coming out story that- whether it’s with friends, family, co-workers, at a conference; somehow where you’re coming out had either some kind of impact on you personally, or the person that you were coming out to?

Alice Derock:

Funny question. So maybe it’s as a sex toy lesbian manufacturer, I don’t come out to everyone saying that I’m a sex toy manufacturer. So it depends on to who I’m talking to, but when I got out, like when I go to a party and it’s a lesbian, you know, LGBT party and I say that I do sex toys, girls are so funny when I tell them that they’re really interested in what I’m doing and they have thousands of questions. And it’s really funny, it’s just like opening something where they can talk about their sexuality easily, you know? And yeah so this is maybe what I could say about this.

Jenn T Grace:

That is funny. And do you have like the top one or two questions that they all seem to ask you? Because I can only imagine. Like I’m even thinking of myself if we ran into each other at an event, the amount of things that would probably pop into my head that I’d be curious to ask you. Do you have like the top two that people just have to know when they talk to you?

Alice Derock:

Yeah, the first question is- hold on I got it, just forgot it. Is- okay the first question is do you manufacture them? So my answer is yes. And then the second answer is where can I buy them?

Jenn T Grace:

And do you think that when you’re talking to individual women, do you think that they are more inclined to want to buy your product; when we’re not talking about advertising, but we’re just talking about you personally meeting someone, or someone from your team and meeting someone. Do you think that they immediately want to buy something from you because you’re a part of the community and you’re designing it for the community? Or do you think it’s for some other reason? I don’t know what the other reason would be but I’m just-

Alice Derock:

Yeah I think it’s they really want to buy because the products are created by lesbians for lesbians, and they are designed with lesbians in mind. So yes, this makes a big difference.

Jenn T Grace:

So it really seems like the key for your entire business is just really getting in front of more lesbians, like that’s really the end goal.

Alice Derock:

Exactly, yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

Because once you get to that lesbian end user, it’s a no-brainer for them to want to purchase from you versus the competition.

Alice Derock:

Yes, exactly.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s awesome, I feel like that is such a good problem to have, when really you’re just looking for more exposure.

Alice Derock:

Thank you, yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

That is funny. And have you- and this is I guess in terms of just out of the box marketing ideas and stuff like that. But I know that there are some sex toy companies that have the- I don’t even know what they call them. Like the home parties where somebody is like- I don’t know what that’s- obviously you’re the one in the industry. But like the version of like the Mary Kay kind of parties or the Tupperware parties.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, yeah sex toy parties, yeah. Sex toy home parties.

Jenn T Grace:

Is that something that you have ever considered doing? Because I feel like that would really get a good amount of- like it would get your products in hands of influential lesbians, or just lesbians in certain communities where they can kind of have some kind of party around it?

Alice Derock:

Yeah we do have some girls doing home parties, that do have Wet For Her products with them.

Jenn T Grace:

That’s awesome.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, they do. Yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

Seems like it would be a good marketing channel for having lesbians working on your behalf.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, also yes. But as we are a designer and manufacturer, we need to team up with someone who already have all the customers, and you know the marketing for that. Yeah we cannot be everywhere.

Jenn T Grace:

No, no. And how do you make those decisions I guess? Like how do you decide when something seems like- I guess the difference between something that’s a shiny object and you just think it’s fun and would want to chase versus something that’s like a really good business opportunity? How do you make those decisions?

Alice Derock:

I think you need to be consistent with your core business. As I said we are a manufacturer and designer, we are not retailers. And being retailers, it’s another company. So building a company does take so long, and so much energy, that if we want to be retailers for example, we- it’s going to take a lot of time, a lot of money, and we might you know be far from what we were at the beginning. So yeah we want to focus on who we are and what we are doing, and not go chasing everywhere.

Jenn T Grace:

Yeah, that makes sense. It’s good to have focus and I find that a lot of business owners don’t necessarily have a really clear vision or really have the diligence to be really focused on one thing. Because you know just the wind blows a different direction, all of a sudden you want to go over there because it just seems like it’d be more fun. But I think your advice of just sticking to your core of what you offer is key.

Alice Derock:

Yeah, and this is where I said the feedback is very important and it’s look at yourselves from where it’s coming – concentrate on it. And don’t think that it’s going to be easy or somewhere else. It’s not true, it will be as difficult as growing your business, it will be difficult to grow another business.

Jenn T Grace:

It’s a really good point, like a really good point. Yeah the grass is not always greener on the other side.

Alice Derock:

Exactly, yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

Very cool. Is there anything else that you would like to mention or talk about before we kind of wrap up and you can just kind of tell people where to find you?

Alice Derock:

No I think we have covered everything, the questions were really good, yeah.

Jenn T Grace:

Awesome, very good. Well I really thank you so much for taking the time out of your busy day, because especially with the amount of stuff you have going on, I’m sure you’re very busy. So thank you. But for anyone listening to this who wants to know more about you, or more about the products, or how to find you or the products, how would you recommend they get in touch with you?

Alice Derock:

The easiest way is to go onwww.WetForHer.com and you have all the products there and retailers where you can find us.

Jenn T Grace:

Perfect, excellent thank you so much. I really appreciate it, and hopefully we will stay in touch.

Alice Derock:

Thank you, Jenn.

About Jenn T. Grace

Jenn T. Grace (she/her/hers) is an award-winning author and founder and CEO of Publish Your Purpose (PYP), the acclaimed hybrid publisher of non-fiction books. Jenn has published 100+ books written by thought leaders, visionaries, and entrepreneurs who are striving to make a difference. Jenn T. Grace’s work elevates and amplifies the voices of others—especially marginalized groups who are regularly excluded from traditional publishing.

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